Author Archives: Kimberley Lynne

Dancing at Lughnasa

Tomorrow night, Tuesday, 22 July, at 7pm in Common Room of the hostel, we’ll read Brian Friel’s 1990 play, Dancing at Lughnasa. Placed in August 1936 in the fictional town of Ballybeg, the play is loosely based on Friel’s mother and aunts when they lived in Glenties in west Donnegal. The story takes place around […]

Only 137 Wild Bees

We’ve asked the theatre pack students to write a Tweet version of their plays, because, at this point in the development process, compressing a ten-minute play into less than 140 characters is a good exercise. Plus, I’ve been asked to submit a play to a DC theatre and part of that application requires a Tweet […]

Casting for Playboy of the Western World

Tomorrow night in the Common Room of the hostel, we’ll read John Millington Synge’s play, The Playboy of the Western World. First produced at the Abbey Theatre in 1907, the production stirred protests. People, particularly Irish Nationalists, felt the story was an offense to public morals and an insult to Ireland. One Sinn Fein leader […]

Writer, Here!

Here on this lush island, the parameters of locality seem smaller; each town displays its individual personality. Perhaps identity shifts between villages, across fields and through streams, haystacks and the boughs of oak trees. Reach the next municipality and, like birds, the townspeople announce their territories: Armagh, here! Portadown,here! Lurgan, here! “Landscape doesn’t have an […]

The History of the Troubles Casting

Hello writers! Great reading tonight of Shadow! Good for you! Tomorrow night we read The History of the Troubles (accordin’ to my Da) by Martin Lynch, Conor Grimes and Alan McKee. We’ll meet Martin next week 18 July in Belfast. History of the Troubles was first performed in May 2002, commissioned as part of the […]

Great Grates

Today’s visual blogging prompt is patterns. I like how we now notice the details around us and under our feet.

The Secret World of Bees

We asked the students to post a visual journal focusing on texture. I like bees; their means of communication and their social structures are fascinating. Plus, they make honey. I also like the contrast of the furry bee bodies to the bell-like and heavy with pollen blooms.